JALANDONIA

DESIGNER.MUSICIAN.ARTIST

excdus:

Yayoi Kusama

I’m here but nothing

Yayoi Kusama began hallucinating spots atop the surfaces of her world at a young age. In these polka dots, at once simple and boundless, Kusama found a way to break from the self and look into infinity.

(via exhibition-ism)

artcomesfirst:


Jimi Hendrix at a private session in London, 1968. Photo by Chris Walter.

13/15 of Forever 27 Club
Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970)

artcomesfirst:

Jimi Hendrix at a private session in London, 1968. Photo by Chris Walter.

13/15 of Forever 27 Club

Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970)

(Source: babeimgonnaleaveu)

centuriespast:

Kalsang Lodoe Oshoe
Tibetan, born 1954
Yamantaka Vajrabhairava Father-Mother, 2006
Tangka: opaque watercolors and gold on cloth
This scroll depicts the buffalo-headed blue Yamantaka Vajrabhairava, the Death Tamer and Diamond Terrifier. With multiple heads, arms, and legs, he represents the fiercesome aspect of Manjusri, the bodhisattva of wisdom. In this powerful manifestation Yamantaka is shown with his blue consort, Vajravetali, in the father-mother embrace that symbolizes the perfect union of wisdom and compassion. A potent ring of flames encircles the couple, while animals and humans are shown beneath their feet. Yamanataka and his consort together represent victory over ignorance and death.
Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University

centuriespast:

Kalsang Lodoe Oshoe

Tibetan, born 1954

Yamantaka Vajrabhairava Father-Mother, 2006

Tangka: opaque watercolors and gold on cloth

This scroll depicts the buffalo-headed blue Yamantaka Vajrabhairava, the Death Tamer and Diamond Terrifier. With multiple heads, arms, and legs, he represents the fiercesome aspect of Manjusri, the bodhisattva of wisdom. In this powerful manifestation Yamantaka is shown with his blue consort, Vajravetali, in the father-mother embrace that symbolizes the perfect union of wisdom and compassion. A potent ring of flames encircles the couple, while animals and humans are shown beneath their feet. Yamanataka and his consort together represent victory over ignorance and death.

Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University