JALANDONIA

DESIGNER.MUSICIAN.ARTIST

projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.

     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.

     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)

     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).

     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.

     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

(via the-actual-universe)


Grand Central Publishing 2011, Design and illustration

Grand Central Publishing 2011, Design and illustration

(via typographie)

lensblr-network:

josephvisserphotography.tumblr.com
I started taking photographs at 15 when I traveled the United States and Europe with my family for nearly 8 months. Since then, interest has grown into passion and since I graduated high school in 2012 I have been pursuing this passion relentlessly and now am able to shoot full time.
Photography has taken me to all sorts of incredible places around the world, opened me up to new experiences and introduced me to new cultures and people.
The call is not to be comfortable is my personal motto and something I try and live by daily. It basically means that I constantly look for ways to push myself beyond what I feel is comfortable, normal, or rational in the hopes that I grow to match that challenge.

lensblr-network:

I started taking photographs at 15 when I traveled the United States and Europe with my family for nearly 8 months. Since then, interest has grown into passion and since I graduated high school in 2012 I have been pursuing this passion relentlessly and now am able to shoot full time.

Photography has taken me to all sorts of incredible places around the world, opened me up to new experiences and introduced me to new cultures and people.

The call is not to be comfortable is my personal motto and something I try and live by daily. It basically means that I constantly look for ways to push myself beyond what I feel is comfortable, normal, or rational in the hopes that I grow to match that challenge.

centuriespast:

Child Teaching Rabbit
Eastman Johnson (1824-1906)
Child Teaching Rabbit
1878
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

centuriespast:

Child Teaching Rabbit

Eastman Johnson (1824-1906)

Child Teaching Rabbit

1878

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

asylum-art:

RGB lighting installation by FlynnTalbot

Red, blue and green lights moving across a faceted triangular structure created multicoloured shadows in this installation by Australian lighting specialist Flynn Talbot (+ movie).

Talbot, whose studio focuses on lighting installation design, created a three-sided panel with one surface covered in spiky cardboard structures of up to two metres in length. This piece was mounted onto a wall at the PSAS gallery in Perth, Australia, for the Primary exhibition.

(via floresenelatico)